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Guest Author: Sheila Olson of fitshiela.com

The demands of work, family, fitness, and life make it a real challenge to successfully care for your mental and physical health. Since experts agree that fitness plays an integral part in overall well-being, here are suggestions to help you find ways to incorporate it into your lifestyle.

Tips and tricks for balancing fitness with self-care

Plan everything
Schedule workouts, bedtime, family outings, relaxation activities, when you’re making dinner, date nights — everything. Sound a little OCD? Perhaps, but plans increase productivity and provide great satisfaction when you cross things off your list!
Do fitness activities you love.
Why stick with something that’s lost its luster? If the gym starts to pale, take a new class. Or suspend your membership for a month and do something  different. Take the bike out for a spin, join a recreational softball team, or gather a group of friends to train together for a 5K. Challenge your partner to regular tennis matches. If you have the space to spare, you can also set up a small home gym with the help of a local handyman, who can help install exercise-safe floors and make modifications to get your room ready for fitness. And since handymen in Wesley Chapel, Florida, cost between $141 and $639 on average, you’ll ultimately save money by canceling your gym membership and setting up shop at home.
Increase your fitness impact.
The Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) says even a 10-minute workout is as effective as a 45-minute sweat session because “a brisk walk or other simple activity delivers several hours of relief, similar to taking aspirin for a headache.” Don’t have 30 minutes together? Schedule three 10-minute or two 15-minute sessions instead. Sign up for a class, since fitness classes last a set amount of time, and instructors know exactly how to make the most of each minute.
Boost workout efficiency.
Another way to maximize workout time is to use compound exercises. Create your own high-intensity interval training (HIIT) workouts that target multiple muscle groups while burning lots of fat and calories. Research shows you’ll gain a lot in 15 minutes of interval training three times a week.
Don’t go it alone.
Join a gym that offers free or inexpensive child care (the average cost of a gym membership is $58). Tag-team with your partner to watch the kids while each of you squeezes in a workout. Find a group of like-minded parents, head to the park or the track, and take turns watching the kids play while the other parents cycle in and out of their workouts. Get the kids involved —they can bike while you run, or you can all bike or hike together. Run or jog at your kid’s practice or during your lunch hour.
Take time for yourself.
Need a little “me” time? Toss the schedule out the window and curl up with that novel. Book a massage. Meet a friend for lunch. Take the kids to the movie. “Me” time is just as important for feeling good about yourself!

Incorporate relaxation into your day

Not a morning person? Starting the day feeling frenzied isn’t a great way to manage stress and anxiety. You could take time the night before to plan the next day so you know what to expect when the alarm goes off. Start the day with some stretches and maybe a little yoga or meditation. Drink a cup of tea and listen to a relaxing, uplifting playlist of your favorite tunes.
Cultivate a hobby—one you’ve enjoyed before but haven’t pursued lately—or try something new. Knitting, coloring, collecting, and reading all work well. And here are 24 more ideas.
Don’t discount the healing power of sleep. Invest in a good pillow, mattress, and sheets. Get a noise machine to block out distractions. Hang room-darkening curtains. Cultivate an evening routine to help your body relax into restful sleep.
Developing fitness and wellness routines that decrease stress, encourage relaxation, and promote mental and physical health benefits everyone. Don’t be afraid to experiment with different types of exercise and self-care. The key to achieving balance is finding a guilt-free plan that supports your lifestyle.

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: Dr. Soham Patel: Plant Based Endocrinologist

youtube : Dr. Soham Patel: Plant Based Endocrinologist

Meet Dr. Soham Patel who is the first plant based endocrinologist that I have been blessed to meet! I am always thrilled to meet specialists like Dr. Patel who can have an enormous impact on so MANY patients. We had an amazing conversation and I also bent his ear about a few of my patients and what he advised worked beautifully! So please listen and learn from the amazing Dr. Patel!
With his passion to provide individualized care for his patients and incorporating nutrition as a cornerstone of his treatment strategy, Dr.Patel set up Center for Preventive Endocrinology and Nutrition in fall of 2018.

He is dual board certified in Internal Medicine and Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and participates in maintenance of certification program. He spends a significant chunk of time to keep updated with latest in nutrition research along with attending international conferences on nutrition every year.

Learn more about Dr. Patel at CFPEN

Thank you for listening and just a reminder this interview is sponsored by the Healthy Human Revolution! We provide the tools and support that you need to improve your health…want to learn more about the whole food plant based diet? Check out our expert free course here! Healthy Human Transformation or if you are ready to join an exclusive community that will have all you will ever need to thrive on the plant based diet, join our Healthy Human Nation by clicking here…Healthy Human Nation


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In today’s day and age we see a lot of commercials and ads about fancy detox protocols and supplements, which are quite expensive. Is that the only way to detox? No. There are natural and inexpensive ways to detox your body.

But first, lets understand why do we need to detox. Never in the history of mankind then now have we been exposed to such a constant barrage of toxic chemicals. You are thinking atmospheric pollution? Well that’s there but that’s not what I am pointing towards. We are exposed to toxic chemicals in our homes day in and day out! Right from the toothpaste that we brush our teeth with to the personal care products that we use to the pesticides in our food that we consume. A lot of these chemicals are categorized as Endocrine Disruptor Chemicals (EDCs) in addition to their cancer causing effects. To give a few examples, phthalates in shampoos/body wash, BPA from plastic, Parabens in body lotions/personal care products, etc. These EDC have been shown to disrupt everything from insulin metabolism to thyroid metabolism to reproductive system.

The water from the tap unfortunately has lot of organic and inorganic pollutants along with heavy metals. The indoor air in the house is more polluted than the outdoor air. There are expensive ways of eliminating these sources of toxin build up in our body you don’t have to break the wallet in trying to be healthy. There are inexpensive ways to address these toxic exposures as listed below in this blog.

Fasting:

When we fast, our body’s full machinery can focus on cleaning up the toxins and healing damaged tissues. There are various ways to fast but one of the simpler ways to fast is to do a water fast. You can start with 24-hour water fast and slowly works towards doing a 48-72 hours water fast at least once a month. You do not have to stay in bed all day while you are fasting but you also do not want to do more than usual exertion when you are fasting. The idea is to conserve all energy to be utilized by the body for detoxification and not get diverted into other tasks. Second important thing when you are fasting is to make sure you are drinking lots of water to aid the removal of those toxins. Investing on a Reverse Osmosis (RO) system to get pure toxin free water would be an ideal scenario but if that is not an option then at least use a tabletop water filter to lower the toxic exposure from the water. You can add more punch to the water you drink but adding slices of lemon, orange or cucumber and create infused water.

Eating whole plant foods:

All fruits and veggies can aid the process detoxification in the liver and the body but there are few, which do that even more efficiently. Cilantro and Parsley are potent in nutrients that help with heavy metal detox. Cruciferous group of vegetables like broccoli, kale, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, etc. increase liver detox potential. Beets have betalains that helps repair liver cells which are doing the detox work. Citrus fruits have antioxidants, which helps our body heal damaged cells. Beans/legumes are loaded with insoluble fiber that helps bulk your stool, which again helps get rid of the toxins in your bile from the liver. The fiber from fruits/veggies/beans is food for the healthy gut bacteria and they actually convert these fibers that we cannot break down into short chain fatty acids, which lowers inflammation in our body. A handful of nuts including almonds and walnuts add a punch of antioxidants to your body that helps lower inflammation in addition to providing essential vitamins and trace minerals. Green tea with some lemon can also increase the antioxidant levels in body, which aids in repair & regeneration of tissues.

Green Smoothies:

If you want to take the detoxification a notch higher than adding a green smoothie to your routine would pack a punch. There are a lot of recipes out there but a basic principle to revolve around is to include big leafy greens like kale/chard/spinach/mustard greens as the base and then some cilantro or parsley to augment the heavy metal detox potential. And then adding a teaspoon of turmeric and black pepper powder as anti-inflammatory spices, small piece of ginger, some mint leaves, dash of lemon juice with some zest and piece of cucumber with water and blend it up. Drink 4-6 ounces of the green smoothie at least 3-4 times a week, even better if you can do it daily.


Sweating:

When we release sweat we are actually releasing toxic products via the sweat. So activities that can make you sweat on a daily basis can greatly augment your detox process. You can go brisk walk for 30-40 minutes or play your favorite sport involving activity outdoors or do elliptical or stationary bike if indoors. Any 30-40 minutes of high intensity exercise that you can sustainably do everyday and which makes you sweat is a great option.

Indoor plants:

Plants that can thrive well indoor and add more color to your home also have additional benefits by aiding the purification of your indoor air. Plants like Pothos, Spider plant, Peace Lilly can be cheap and effective way in purifying indoor air and beautify your home at the same time.

Beauty sleep:

Sleep is not just essential to rest but also the essential time when your body repairs and regenerates tissues. Good practice is to have a steady bedtime everyday, including the weekends too and preferably between 9-10pm. The liver detox followed by gut detox happens between 11pm to 4am so you really want to be fast asleep before 11pm so that your body has enough time to handle the detoxification. Also good quality 7-8 hours of sleep with bedtime by 10pm is more in sync with the circadian rhythm than same amount of hours but going to bed after midnight. A balanced circadian rhythm ensures that your stress hormones and insulin level stay low during sleep, which is ideal. Like fasting, sleep is when body is healing itself so try not to have a bedtime snack because that compels your body to keep the regeneration/repair work aside and focus on processing and assimilating the meal load you just ate. So a good way is to limit food or beverage intake after 7pm or at least 2 hours before bedtime.

Avoidance of plastic:

Bisphenol-A (BPA) from single use plastics and Bisphenol-S (BPS) found in “BPA free” plastic wares are equally harmful. Drinking water is good practice but if you are doing it from plastic water bottles then you are also getting a healthy dose of BPA. BPA has been shown to up regulate genes that can increase insulin resistance. BPA also has been shown to increase risk of breast cancer. Hence, a better alternative is to buy a steel thermos and carry water along with you. Even if the thermos is left in the car exposed to heat, it is not going to release any toxins into the water like the plastic bottle and still keep the water cool. Do not microwave food in plastic containers; instead use glass containers to carry your food. Another huge source of BPA is the receipts you get anytime you shop. These receipts are lined by BPA to prevent the printed ink from wading off. So receipts that are not important, ask the cashier to discard them. If there are important purchases you are making, there is always an option to get emailed receipts instead of printed ones in today’s time. If you have to get a physical receipt, spend the least amount of time holding it and wash your hands off with water after you done with it.

So you can see without breaking your budget, you can still make lifestyle changes, which can help you in addressing the toxic chemical burden to a large extent that we face on a day-to-day basis. There a lot of other ways too to handle toxin exposure but these 7 steps are a good starting point. Time and energy spent on staying healthy is well spent than suffering the consequences and end up spending lot more resources to fix it.
Until next blog, in health and wellness,
Soham Patel, MD

You can follow Dr. Patel on
Facebook
Twitter


Medical Disclaimer:

The information put forth in this blog cannot be construed as medical advice in any form. Please consult your physician or qualified healthcare professional for individualized treatment plan especially if you intend to do water fasting and/or are on any prescription medications.

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Modern science has come a long way from discovery of the first antibiotic Penicillin back in 1928 to advent of genetic testing and personalized medicine in 21st century. To quote Dr. Alexander Fleming, the Scottish scientist who discovered Penicillin, “I did not invent Penicillin. Nature did that. I only discovered it by accident.”

The approach of killing or attacking the microbial organisms has flourished over time with antibiotics, antivirals, anti-parasitic and anti-fungal agents but using the same approach to tackle the epidemic of chronic diseases like diabetes, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, heart disease, stroke, cancers and dementia has failed miserably as evident from the burgeoning healthcare costs and burden of diseases we are seeing today.


As scientific studies over the last few decades has shown, most of these chronic lifestyle diseases can be prevented and treated and many times reversed with the right lifestyle and nutrition. I started delving in to nutrition during my first year of Endocrinology fellowship but it did not start there. My maternal grandfather, Muljibhai Patel who followed principles of natural hygiene for most of his adult life and lived a very productive and thriving 84 years of life was my first inspiration. He being an avid reader, spent hours and hours in public libraries and gathered a mountain of knowledge that he implemented from that.

In spite of his constant reminders and suggestions to adopt a similar lifestyle I somehow did not seem to get the message into action. But in the first year of my Endocrinology fellowship, it just dawned on me to look at the science of plant based nutrition and to my surprise, I found scientific studies dating as back as 1921 showing benefits of whole plant foods. I came to know of groundbreaking studies undertaken by pioneers of lifestyle medicine like Drs. Dean Ornish, John McDougall, Caldwell Esselstyn, Neal Barnard, Joel Fuhrman and many more. This changed my approach towards medicine. The first step I did was to adopt a whole food plant based lifestyle in Nov 2014 and I have no doubt in saying that this has been the best change I ever made in my life. My energy improved, the flab I had around my abdomen melted, and my sleep quality improved and I felt better. This was just within the first month of the change and since then I haven’t looked back. Over time I have added twice a week high intensity interval exercise, intermittent fasting, better sleep hygiene in my routine and the benefits of all those together have only increased.


In clinical Endocrinology practice since 2015, I have adopted the same approach for my patients, focusing on improving their nutrition and other aspects of optimal lifestyle and the patients who have made drastic changes have reaped drastic results like reversing their type 2 diabetes and coming off medications, coming off insulin and having better blood glucose control, lowering their cholesterol and blood pressure medications. As I tell my patients, I will state it here too, if you need drastic results then go for drastic changes and if you need incremental results then go for incremental changes. Even my patients with type 1 diabetes who have gained weight over years from improper nutrition and needing more insulin on top of the lack of ability to produce insulin when adopt a whole food plant based lifestyle, need half the amount of insulin then before, are able to lose the excess weight, sleep better, feel more energetic.

If we look at the Blue zones, which are regions of world where people life a thriving life closer to 100 years or more, we can get a very comprehensive model of what behaviors can promote health and longevity. I had the opportunity to attend the International Conference on Nutrition in Medicine in Washington, DC in early part of August 2018. The dinner talk was by Dan Buettner, who discovered these regions around the world and undertook the famous Blue zones project by National Geographic. The learning from this project boils down to having the right lifestyle for disease free health and thriving life. If I attempt to summarize the main findings then they would as follows:

  • 90-100% plant based whole foods diet (beans/vegetables/fruits/whole grains/nuts with animal food intake more like a flavor once a week and not the main course)
  • Daily activity for 45 minutes
  • Sleep at least 7.5 hours a day
  • Having a purpose in life (In Okinawa, Japan which is one of the blue zones it is called “Ikigai”)
  • Having the social support of family and friends
  • Having faith (does not matter which philosophy/religion/dominion you follow but having connection with the Divine) and spending some time every day towards prayer/meditation)
  • Respect for your elders (not looking onto them as a burden but instead a repository of wisdom and knowledge of the decades of life that they have seen before you)
  • Being in contact with nature (spending time outdoors, connecting with mother Earth)


In summary, I would say that being in sync with nature and eating whole plant foods holds the key to addressing most of the chronic lifestyle disease that we are battling as a society. My mission is to keep spreading the power of plants and optimal lifestyle and do my bit in promoting true health and wellness.

Until next blog, in health and wellness!

Soham Patel, MD

You can follow Dr.Patel on
Facebook
Twitter

References:

Tan, S. and Tatsumura, Y. (2018). Alexander Fleming (1881–1955): Discoverer of penicillin. SMJ. Retrieved August 25, 2018 from,

http://www.smj.org.sg/article/alexander-fleming-1881-1955-discoverer-penicillin

Willet, W.C. et al (1970, January 01), Prevention of chronic disease by means of diet and lifestyle changes, Retrieved August 25, 2018, from

https://www.ncbi.nlm.gov/books/NBK11795/

The Blue Zones Story. (n.d.). Retrieved August 25, 2018, from

https://www.bluezones.com



Contact Us


27415 Cashford Cir
Suite 102
Wesley Chapel, FL 33544


(813) 670-3228


(813) 463-7972


info@cfpen.org



Clinic Hours


Monday to Thursday 8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Friday 8:30 am to 12:00 pm

Closed on Weekends & Holidays



Social Networks



Contact Us


27415 Cashford Cir
Suite 102
Wesley Chapel, FL 33544


(813) 670-3228


(813) 463-7972


info@cfpen.org


Clinic Hours


Monday to Thursday 8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Friday 8:30 am to 12:00 pm

Closed on Weekends & Holidays



Social Networks




Medical Disclaimer: The information contained on this website is purely for educational purpose and can not be constituted as professional medical advice. Please consult and work with a qualified health professional for diagnosis, treatment and individualized management of your health conditions.
© CFPEN.org 2018



Medical Disclaimer: The information contained on this website is purely for educational purpose and can not be constituted as professional medical advice. Please consult and work with a qualified health professional for diagnosis, treatment and individualized management of your health conditions.
© CFPEN.org 2018